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dc.contributor.authorColin Meeken_US
dc.contributor.authorWilliam Birminghamen_US
dc.contributor.editorHolger H. Hoosen_US
dc.contributor.editorDavid Bainbridgeen_US
dc.date.accessioned2004-10-21T04:26:22Z
dc.date.available2004-10-21T04:26:22Z
dc.date.issued2003-10-26en_US
dc.identifier.isbn0-9746194-0-Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://jhir.library.jhu.edu/handle/1774.2/10
dc.description.abstractQuery-by-humming systems attempt to address the needs of the non-expert user, for whom the most natural query format -- for the purposes of finding a tune, hook or melody of unknown providence -- is to sing it. While human listeners are quite tolerant of error in these queries, a music retrieval mechanism must explicitly model such errors in order to perform its task. We will present a unifying view of existing models, illuminating the assumptions underlying their respective designs, and demonstrating where such assumptions succeed and fail, through analysis and real-world experiments.en_US
dc.format.extent461383 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherJohns Hopkins Universityen_US
dc.subjectIR Systems and Algorithmsen_US
dc.subjectDigital Librariesen_US
dc.titleThe dangers of parsimony in query-by-humming applicationsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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