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dc.contributor.authorVinson, Ben, III
dc.date.accessioned2008-04-03T16:35:46Z
dc.date.available2008-04-03T16:35:46Z
dc.date.issued2000
dc.identifier.citation57:2 October 2000, 269-282en_US
dc.identifier.issn57:2 October 2000, 269-282
dc.identifier.urihttp://jhir.library.jhu.edu/handle/1774.2/32702
dc.description.abstractLate colonial Mexico possessed one of the largest free-colored populations in Spanish America, numbering around 370,000 in 1793. The colony’s pardos, morenos, and mulattos were highly dispersed, being found throughout the major urban centers, coastal zones, rural areas, and in selected portions of the northern frontier. Studies conducted over the past two decades have assisted enormously in reconstructing the free-colored demographic profile, with particular emphasis on occupational and marriage patterns. Much of this research has resulted from sustained examinations of the caste vs. class debate, which has attempted to understand the manner in which the caste system worked in structuring colonial social relations.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThe Mellon Foundationen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe Americasen_US
dc.subjectRural Mexico, Costa Chica, Igualapa, 1791, Racial Profileen_US
dc.titleTHE RACIAL PROFILE OF A RURAL MEXICANen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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