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dc.contributor.authorKachersky, Luke
dc.contributor.authorSankar, Sen
dc.contributor.authorKim, Hyeong-Min
dc.date.accessioned2009-10-09T17:26:51Z
dc.date.available2009-10-09T17:26:51Z
dc.date.issued2009-10
dc.identifier.urihttp://jhir.library.jhu.edu/handle/1774.2/33516
dc.description.abstractConsumers subconsciously prefer brand names that resemble their own names - an effect called name letter branding. We extend it and propose that a reversal of name letter branding, wherein consumers will subconsciously avoid self-resembling seller names, is possible when the buyer anticipates self-concept damage from an association with the seller. We find evidence of such behavior, which we call implicit distancing, in three studies. We show name letter branding and implicit distancing in actual transactions and determine underlying causal mechanisms in two experiments. Our findings suggest that self-concept motives determine the prevalence of name letter branding or implicit distancing.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis benefited from a PSC-CUNY grant awarded to the second author.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherCarey Business School, Johns Hopkins Universityen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesThe Johns Hopkins Carey Business School Working Paper Series;09-10-001;
dc.subjectDistancingen
dc.subjectAuctionen
dc.subjectM39; Marketing and Advertising: Otheren
dc.subjectImplicit egotismen
dc.titleImplicit distancing in Auction: When name letter branding backfiresen
dc.typeWorking Paperen


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