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dc.contributor.authorGans, David
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Kai
dc.contributor.authorHough, Douglas
dc.date.accessioned2010-01-12T15:10:03Z
dc.date.available2010-01-12T15:10:03Z
dc.date.issued2010-01
dc.identifier.citation2010-01-001en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://jhir.library.jhu.edu/handle/1774.2/33770
dc.description.abstractAbstract Physician practices in the US are largely small-scale, independently-run enterprises, despite their potential critical role in creating a more integrated health care system. Using an approach that builds on – and extends – prior research, we estimate physician practice production functions for different types of practices (multispecialty, single-specialty, and six subspecialties within single-specialty practices). We find that these practices have distinct production functions, and that size has different implications for each. In particular, we find that the median size physician practice is well below the size suggested by the estimated production function and marginal products of physicians, for almost all practice types. These results have interesting implications for health policy.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherJohns Hopkins University Carey Business Schoolen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesThe Johns Hopkins Carey Business School Working Paper Series;
dc.subjectI11, D24en_US
dc.subjectmarginal producten_US
dc.subjectproduction functionen_US
dc.subjectphysician practiceen_US
dc.titleSize Matters: The Impact of Physician Practice Size on Productivityen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US


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