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dc.contributor.advisorNguyen, Thao D.en_US
dc.creatorHu, Yuxuanen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-23T04:40:00Z
dc.date.available2014-12-23T04:40:00Z
dc.date.created2014-05en_US
dc.date.issued2014-03-26en_US
dc.date.submittedMay 2014en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://jhir.library.jhu.edu/handle/1774.2/37073
dc.description.abstractThe motivation for this research was to fill gaps in the current understanding of the electromechanical interactions in the heart, with the expectation that this improved understanding will lead to better treatment for cardiac diseases, specifically cardiac arrhythmias and dyssynchronous heart failure (DHF). This research was conducted using a computer modeling approach, making it possible to analyze the electrical and mechanical activity in the whole heart at a high spatiotemporal resolution. First, it was investigated how the recruitment of stretch-activated channel (SAC) affects scroll wave stability. Second, the predominant mechanism underlying stroke work improvement in the acute response of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) was determined. Third, the feasibility of optimizing CRT pacing locations to achieve maximal hemodynamics improvement while simultaneously minimizing ATP consumption heterogeneity throughout the left ventricle in the DHF ventricles was demonstrated. Regarding the effects of mechano-electric feedback on arrhythmias, It was found that recruitment of SAC affects scroll wave stability differently depending on SAC reversal potential and channel conductance; the mechanisms are also different. Regarding CRT therapy for DHF patients, the predominant mechanism underlying stroke work improvement in the acute response of CRT was found to be efficient preloading of the ventricles by a properly timed atrial contraction instead of resynchronization of ventricular contraction. Reduction of mitral regurgitation by CRT led to stroke work worsening. Lastly, an ATP based method to optimize CRT pacing sites was suggested for DHF ventricles. This research provides insights into the electromechanical interactions in the heart, and will contribute to the development of better treatment for cardiac diseases, specifically cardiac arrhythmias and DHF.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.languageen
dc.publisherJohns Hopkins University
dc.subjectCardiac Arrhythmiasen_US
dc.subjectCardiac Resynchronization Therapyen_US
dc.titleElectromechanical interactions in the heart: a computational studyen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineBiomedical Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.grantorJohns Hopkins Universityen_US
thesis.degree.grantorSchool of Medicineen_US
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US
thesis.degree.departmentBiomedical Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberTrayanova, Nataliaen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberMac Gabhann, Feilimen_US


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