Now showing items 38-48 of 48

    • Quantitative Comparisons into Content-Based Music Recognition with the Self Organising Map 

      Gavin Wood; Simon O'Keefe (Johns Hopkins University, 2003-10-26)
      With so much modern music being so widely available both in electronic form and in more traditional physical formats, a great opportunity exists for the development of a general-purpose recognition and music classification ...
    • Rhythmic Similarity through Elaboration 

      Mitchell Parry; Irfan Essa (Johns Hopkins University, 2003-10-26)
      Rhythmic similarity techniques for audio tend to evaluate how close to identical two rhythms are. This paper proposes a similarity metric based on rhythmic elaboration that matches rhythms that share the same beats regardless ...
    • RWC Music Database: Music Genre Database and Musical Instrument Sound Database 

      Masataka Goto; Hiroki Hashiguchi; Takuichi Nishimura; Ryuichi Oka (Johns Hopkins University, 2003-10-26)
      This paper describes the design policy and specifications of the RWC Music Database, a copyright-cleared music database (DB) compiled specifically for research purposes. Shared DBs are common in other research fields and ...
    • A scalable Peer-to-Peer System for Music Content and Information Retrieval 

      George Tzanetakis; Jun Gao; Peter Steenkiste (Johns Hopkins University, 2003-10-26)
      Currently a large percentage of internet traffice consists of music files, typically stored in MP3 compressed audio format, shared and exchanged over Peer-to-Peer (P2P) networks. Searching for music is performed by specifying ...
    • A Specialized Open Archives Initiative Harvester for Sheet Music: A Project Report and Examination of Issues 

      Stephen Davison; Cynthia Requardt; Kristine Brancolini (Johns Hopkins University, 2003-10-26)
      The Open Archives Initiative (OAI) Sheet Music Project is a consortium of institutions building OAI-compliant data providers, a metadata harvester, and a web-based service provider for digital sheet music collections. The ...
    • A SVM ¨C Based Classification Approach to Musical Audio 

      Namunu Chinthaka Maddage; Changsheng Xu; Ye Wang (Johns Hopkins University, 2003-10-26)
      This paper describes an automatic heirarchical music classification approach based on support vector machines (SVM). Based on the proposed method, the music is classified into coursed classes such as vocal, instrumental ...
    • Three Dimensional Continuous DP Algorithm for Multiple Pitch Candidates in Music Information Retrieval System 

      Sungphil Heo; Motoyuki Suzuki; Akinori Ito; Shozo Makino (Johns Hopkins University, 2003-10-26)
      This paper threats theoretical and practical issues that implement a music information retrieval system based on query by humming. In order to extract accuracy features from the user's humming, we propose a new retrieval ...
    • Toward the Scientific Evaluation of Music Information Retrieval Systems 

      J. Stephen Downie (Johns Hopkins University, 2003-10-26)
      This paper outlines the findings-to-date of a project to assist in the efforts being made to establish a TREC-like evaluation paradigm within the Music Information Retrieval (MIR) research community. The findings and ...
    • Using morphological description for generic sound retrieval 

      Julien Ricard; Perfecto Herrera (Johns Hopkins University, 2003-10-26)
      Systems for sound retrieval are usually “source-centred”. This means that retrieval is based on using the proper keywords that define or specify a sound source. Although this type of description is of great interest, it ...
    • Using Transportation Distances for Measuring Melodic Similarity 

      Rainer Typke; Panos Giannopoulos; Remco C. Veltkamp; Frans Wiering; René van Oostrum (Johns Hopkins University, 2003-10-26)
      Most of the existing methods for measuring melodic similarity use one-dimensional textual representations of music notation, so that melodic similarity can be measured by calculating editing distances. We view notes as ...
    • Was Parsons right? An experiment in usability of music representations for melody-based music retrieval 

      Alexandra Uitdenbogerd; Yaw Wah Yap (Johns Hopkins University, 2003-10-26)
      In 1975 Parsons developed his dictionary of musical themes based on a simple contour representation. The motivation was that people with little training in music would be able to identify pieces of music. We decided to ...