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dc.contributor.advisorClark, Sarah
dc.contributor.advisorCosey , Nicole
dc.creatorGreenspan, Rachel L
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-28T19:56:15Z
dc.date.available2022-02-28T19:56:15Z
dc.date.created2021-12
dc.date.issued2022-01-21
dc.date.submittedDecember 2021
dc.identifier.urihttp://jhir.library.jhu.edu/handle/1774.2/66873
dc.description.abstractThe spread of false information online has become a leading threat to the stability and security of democracies across the globe, as misleading information continues to influence the behaviors and attitudes of increasingly polarized populations. Existing literature makes clear that there is great value in both human-centered and technology-based approaches to countering mis/disinformation, and that a sustainable, long-term, whole-of-society solution will require a practical combination of both measures. However, this field of study lacks a clear understanding of under what circumstances each individual approach may be more or less sufficient. This paper will test the notion that as time sensitivity increases in cases of widespread mis/disinformation, that the use of technology-based solutions, involving fact-checking services and the removal of false content and users online, becomes increasingly effective as the primary tool employed to mitigate the effects of mis/disinformation. The method used in this study is a qualitative content analysis of cases of national crises in the United States, including the COVID-19 Pandemic and the rise of Domestic Violent Extremism (DVE). Altogether, the results of this study point to the insufficiencies of technology-based solutions acting alone to mitigate the effects of widespread mis/disinformation specifically under time sensitive conditions associated with national crises. However, this analysis highlights the apparent strengths, weaknesses, and associated challenges of both technology-based and human-centered approaches to mitigating the effects and increasing civic resiliency to mis/disinformation online. In doing so, the study provides further insights into the ways in which technology-based and human-centered approaches can be employed simultaneously, and often in sync with one another, to have the greatest impact.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherJohns Hopkins University
dc.subjectDisinformation
dc.subjectMisinformation
dc.subjecthuman-centered
dc.subjecttechnology-based
dc.subjectfact-checking
dc.subjectmedia literacy
dc.titleHUMAN-CENTERED VERSUS TECHNOLOGY-BASED APPROACHES TO MITIGATING THE EFFECTS OF WIDESPREAD MIS/DISINFORMATION: WHEN IS ONE APPROACH MORE OR LESS SUFFICIENT?
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.disciplineGlobal Security Studies
thesis.degree.grantorJohns Hopkins University
thesis.degree.grantorAdvanced Academic Programs
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameM.A.
dc.date.updated2022-02-28T19:56:15Z
dc.type.materialtext
thesis.degree.departmentGlobal Security Studies
dc.publisher.countryUSA


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