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dc.contributor.advisorGrenier, Stephen
dc.contributor.advisorClarke , Sarah
dc.contributor.advisorO'Bryan, Sarah
dc.creatorBowlus, Spencer
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-28T19:56:18Z
dc.date.available2022-02-28T19:56:18Z
dc.date.created2021-12
dc.date.issued2022-01-24
dc.date.submittedDecember 2021
dc.identifier.urihttp://jhir.library.jhu.edu/handle/1774.2/66877
dc.description.abstractResearch study assessing whether the Chinese Domination of the Supply Chain of Rare Earth is Affecting the Relative Power of China Compared to the United States. The paper explores the linkage between natural resource monopolies and power. A Literature Review was conducted researching scholarship for Defining Power in International Relations, Technology and Power, Rare Earth Elements in China, Natural Resource Monopolies and US policy regarding rare earth. Five variables were defined and developed to answer the hypothesis. The five variables used in the assessment included the following: Industry, Innovation, Strategic Reserves, Weapons Systems and Research and Development (R&D). The assessment concluded there was clear evidence of China gaining relative power due to its monopoly in rare earth, but the values were not as overwhelming as the author initially expected.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherJohns Hopkins University
dc.subjectChina
dc.subjectRare Earth
dc.subjectPower
dc.titleHow is the Chinese Domination of the Supply Chain of Rare Earth Elements Affecting the Relative Power of China Compared to the US?
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.disciplineGlobal Security Studies
thesis.degree.grantorJohns Hopkins University
thesis.degree.grantorAdvanced Academic Programs
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameM.A.
dc.date.updated2022-02-28T19:56:18Z
dc.type.materialtext
thesis.degree.departmentGlobal Security Studies
dc.publisher.countryUSA


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