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dc.contributor.advisorHardwick, Marie
dc.creatorMo, Zengshuo
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-01T15:21:36Z
dc.date.created2022-05
dc.date.issued2022-05-06
dc.date.submittedMay 2022
dc.identifier.urihttp://jhir.library.jhu.edu/handle/1774.2/67396
dc.description.abstractApoptosis is a form of programmed cell death that plays an important role during embryonic development and for maintaining homeostasis of the human body by removing damaged, aged or unwanted cells. The BCL-2 family of proteins are key regulators of apoptosis and share BCL-2 homology (BH) motifs. BCL-2 homologs and BH3-only proteins exert pro- and anti-apoptotic functions and interact with each other to form a complex network that regulates apoptosis. Their interactions are regulated by a third group of proteins, the BH3-only proteins. A key BH3-only protein is the pro-apoptotic protein BID, which must be activated to kill cells, typically by caspase cleavage. BID promotes cell death by competitively inhibiting anti-death BCL-2 family proteins, by directly activating pro-apoptotic BCL-2 family proteins, and was recently reported to directly permeabilize mitochondrial outer membranes similar to Bax (pro-apoptotic BCL-2 homolog). However, very little is known about the function of BID prior to caspase cleavage. BID is thought to function as a sensor of DNA damage leading to cell death, and may have non-apoptotic functions such as participating in lipid and DNA damage signaling. In this thesis, I sought to investigate the function of extra-long human isoform 1 of BID (BIDEL) in mitochondria, focusing on the localization and mitochondrial targeting mechanism of BIDEL. We found that the unique N-terminal sequence of BIDEL plays an important role in mitochondrial localization, and that a subset of arginine residues are critical for this function.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherJohns Hopkins University
dc.subjectApoptosis, BID, Mitochondria.
dc.titleUNIQUE N-TERMINUS OF HUMAN BID ISOFORM-1 TARGETS MITOCHONDRIA
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.disciplineImmunology
thesis.degree.grantorJohns Hopkins University
thesis.degree.grantorBloomberg School of Public Health
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameSc.M.
dc.date.updated2022-08-01T15:21:36Z
dc.type.materialtext
thesis.degree.departmentMolecular Microbiology and Immunology
local.embargo.lift2026-05-01
local.embargo.terms2026-05-01
dc.publisher.countryUSA


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