Black Activist Mothering: A Historical Intersection of Race, Gender, and Class

Show full item record

Title: Black Activist Mothering: A Historical Intersection of Race, Gender, and Class
Author: Bell McDonald, Katrina
Abstract: The prevalence of poor health among young disadvantaged Black mothers and their children has prompted a revival of maternal activism among Black middle-class urban women. A study of the California-based "Birthing Project," founded in 1988, reveals that such activism is best understood as a modern-day version of Black activist mothering practiced by African-American clubwomen from the time of slavery to the early 1940s. This article demonstrates the legacy of "normative empathy" as a significant motivator for middle-class maternal activism and as a basis for a middle-class critique of Black mothering among the disadvantaged.
URI: http://jhir.library.jhu.edu/handle/1774.2/937
Date: 1997
Subject: BLACKS
MOTHERS' CLUBS
SOCIOECONOMIC FACTORS
Series: Hopkins Population Center Papers on Population
WP97-04

Files in this item

Files Size Format Download
wp97_04.pdf 100.3Kb application/pdf Download

The following license files are associated with this item:

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record