DEVELOPING AND APPLYING A KNOWLEDGE TRANSLATION FRAMEWORK TO EVALUATE REMOTE CAPACITY BUILDING WORKSHOPS IN NIGERIA AND INDIA THROUGH THE STRIPE INITIATIVE

Embargo until
2026-08-01
Date
2023-07-17
Journal Title
Journal ISSN
Volume Title
Publisher
Johns Hopkins University
Abstract
Background Workshops are a common Knowledge Translation (KT) tool in Public Health to build capacity in a relatively short period of time, especially for working professionals. This research aims to better understand the impact of remote methods on workshops and conduct an evaulation on impact of two remote workshops conducted as part of the STRIPE (Synthesis and Translation of Research and Innovations from Polio Eradication) initiative. These papers will do the following. First conduct a literature review to outline the strengths, weaknesses opporuntity and threats associated with using remote workshops and identify the best practices to mitigate those weaknesses and threats. Second, develop a new conceptual framework leveraging KT, learning evaluation and implementation science theories to generate a consolidated framework to evaluate multi-site workshops. Third, implement the tools generated from that framework to evaluate changes in knowledge and self-efficacy from the two workshops conducted as part of the STRIPE initiative. Methods The first manuscript will be conducted using a PRISMA literature review methodology followed by content analysis to develop themes for the analysis. The second manuscript will follow Jabareen’s methodology for generating conceptual frameworks and the third manuscript will implement a traditional pre-post survey to collect information about the workshop and the participants to evaluate the impact and efficacy of the workshop. Statistical comparisons will be done via the McNemar test. Results The first manuscript outlines that remote workshops are feasible and may have more advantages compared to in-person but there are unique pitfalls to a remote model including ensuring technology access, usability, and engagement. The main best practice identified was taking the time to appropriately plan, adapt and implement a remote workshop. The conceptual framework developed for evaulation was a blending of 24 concepts, classified over 2 levels of context and 5 steps of knowledge translation from engagement to behavior change. The two STRIPE workshops were evaluated using this framework, demonstrated modest gains in knowledge and self-efficacy; however, identifying co-variates was difficult due to sample size and lack of qualitative. The use of the novel framework provided a unique lens in evaluating the STRIPE’s multi-site workshops showing that adaptions and different implementation styles had an impact on the evaluation outcomes. Conclusions Overall, this body of research provides a practical guide for educators when planning remote workshops, a set of tools to evaluate those workshops and an example of how those workshops could be evaluated. Future research is required to validate the conceptual framework.
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Keywords
Implementation Science, Evaluation
Citation