HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONALS’ FEAR OF CONTRACTING COVID-19, BURNOUT, AND PERCEPTION OF THE QUALITY OF CARE IN GHANA: A MIXED METHODS STUDY

Embargo until
2027-05-01
Date
2023-04-18
Journal Title
Journal ISSN
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Publisher
Johns Hopkins University
Abstract
SARS-CoV-2, a coronavirus, was discovered in China in December 2019 and has since infected millions globally. Globally, over 600 million infections and 6.8 million fatalities attributable to COVID-19 have been confirmed as of February 2023. While Ghana, a country in sub-Saharan West Africa, has recorded 171,152 cases and 1,462 deaths as of February 2023. Africa accounts for only approximately 2 percent of all SARS-CoV-2 infections worldwide as of January 01, 2023. Ghana recorded its first two cases of SARS-CoV-2, also known as the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), on March 12, 2020. The pandemic spread quickly across Ghana, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Like any developing country, Ghana's health system is strained by a high patient-to-doctor and patient-to-nurse ratio and a chronic shortage of medicines and supplies. Thus, the potential of Ghana's health system to be overwhelmed with an increasing number of cases during a COVID-19 pandemic is very high. This study used a mixed methods approach to evaluate the impact of the pandemic on healthcare professionals' fear of contracting COVID-19, burnout, preparedness, and the perceived quality of care provided. Data were obtained from a quantitative survey of 323 healthcare professionals and an interview with 26 healthcare professionals. The data was obtained through a cross-sectional online survey of healthcare professionals in Ghana. Regression models assessed the association between preparedness, fear of contracting COVID-19 infection, and burnout. Logistic models were used to determine the association between burnout, perceived quality of health services, and provider-patient interaction. A mediation analysis was used to determine the relationship between preparedness and burnout mediated by fear of COVID-19. Research findings revealed preparedness was associated with a decreased fear of contracting COVID-19. Results additionally showed fear of contracting COVID-19 partially mediates the relationship between preparedness and burnout. Also, the fear of contracting COVID-19 had a positive relationship with burnout. Burnout also impacted patient-provider communication, but healthcare professionals' burnout did not affect time spent with patients. Interviews revealed most healthcare professionals had some training/protocols on COVID-19 during the pandemic. Some healthcare workers feared contracting COVID-19 due to a lack of personal protective equipment, inadequate training, and protocols.
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Keywords
Healthcare professionals', COVID-19 pandemic, PPEs.
Citation