BEDTIME IN A BOX: A WORTHY PARENT INTERVENTION TO ADDRESS THE SCHOOL READINESS OF PRESCHOOLERS RESIDING IN AN URBAN COMMUNITY

Embargo until
2020-08-01
Date
2018-07-20
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Volume Title
Publisher
Johns Hopkins University
Abstract
Government documents, state reports, and peer-reviewed empirical research were reviewed to understand why children who reside in areas where concentrated poverty is pervasive, are entering kindergarten underprepared. Moreover, the review of the literature was used to discover underlying factors that affect the standardized test performance of minority kindergartners. After examining historical educational approaches to minorities in the US, parent perceptions of school readiness, as well as the economic and academic of implications of public investments in pre-kindergarten (pre-K), the results were conflicting. Review of prior studies yield support for proponents and opponents of public investments in pre-K as well as highlight various factors that lead to minority children entering kindergarten underprepared. The literature review did not yield substantial information regarding why parents in minority communities decided to enroll or not enroll their children in early learning programs. However, the literature review did reveal a gap in the presence of parent education programs that address school readiness as it relates to academic achievement and cognitive stimulation in the home environment. According to research, most parent education programs address behavior concerns for school readiness but not address academic preparedness skills. Moreover, the literature supports the use of alternative at-home parent interventions to increase the school readiness skills of children. For these reasons, Bedtime in a Box (BiaB) was a parent intervention worthy of a program evaluation to determine its influence school readiness skills of rising kindergarterners enrolled in pre-K. This mixed methods study using 36 intervention and 20 comparison parent-child dyads found that BiaB was slightly effective in 1) increasing parent efficacy for school readiness skills and 2) moderately effective increasing the school readiness skills of pre-K children students using multiple standardized measures.
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Keywords
parent intervention
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